Considering working for the Government?

Have you ever thought of working for the government? Would you like to take this opportunity to network with representatives from the government? SFU Career Services and the Arts and Social Sciences Co-op is co-hosting a signature event called, What Can I Do In Government? on Wednesday, November 17th, 2010. Session one starts at 12:30pm. Session 2 starts at 2:30pm. For more information, please check out Symplicity at http://www.sfu.ca/wil/symplicity/ (SFU students only).

At this event, you will be able to connect with representatives working in the federal, provincial, and municipal public service. This event will be a Philosopher Cafe’s approach where students are encouraged to ask questions about the career and the working life in the government. You will also get the chance to interact with different table hosts  and peers because you will be moving from table to table at the event during the session.

Who knows, this might be a great networking opportunity where you can find your career path!

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Cold Calling X99

So, a few weeks ago I went to a Sales Training through Skype, facilitated by fellow AIESECer, Christina Buiza. As my first time participating in a skype meeting, I felt it went fairly smoothly. She briefly went over the purpose of cold calling, preparing for a cold call, what goes on during a cold call, and how to follow-up. The following are the main points that I took from the session which will hopefully demystifies the whole concept of cold calling and may even encourage you to go and try it out for yourself. If you have any other tips, comments, or questions, post them =D

1. The main purpose of a cold call is to sell AIESEC and get a meeting set up regarding taking in an intern =]

2. When researching for a company, always be checking in Salesforce, either to start off your search or to check if you can contact the company you found, always be checking in Salesforce.

3. In Salesforce there are three rules to keep in mind: The 6 Month Rule, Account Rule, and Alumni Rule. Here’s a ppt that give more information (which is pretty much the presentation outline).

4. A cold call should only last about 5 minutes. Try to only talk about the benefits of having an AIESEC intern leaving the costs for later, overcome resistance by asking WHY WHY WHY, offer sending them the marketing package, get their contact information and thank them for their time.

5. Here is a list of 15 things you absolutely need to know by heart before you go on a marketing call. The list contains the nitty gritties of internships.

6. Don’t take comments personally and just do it! =D

Mentorship Experience

I am participating in a mentorship program as a mentee in YWiB SFU, and I went to the orientation of mentorship this Friday to meet other mentees and mentors.

One thing I learn from mentorship is that the mentee should have specific goals that he/she wants to accomplish in mind and mentor will be the one that is guiding the mentee to accomplish those goals. Goals should be set in the first meeting.

Mentee should be the one that is maintaining the relationship. In a mentee-mentor relationship, not only the mentee will learn and benefit, but so will the mentor.

Another interesting thing is that in a statistic report, it shows that female mentor tends to be more like a teacher, and male mentor tends to be more like friend. For example, female mentors would give advise to their mentees and try to help them to accomplish their goals, but male mentors will open their  network to their mentees.

People that are or are thinking of participating in AIESEC Mentorship Program could take these comments in mind 🙂

How-to Guide for International Conferences!

My first conference in Malaysia, 2009.

Going on an AIESEC internship is not the only way to gain international experience and expand your network. You can also go to the conferences outside Canada! Did you know there are over 470 AIESEC conferences held every year all around the world?

I started my AIESEC experience with facilitating a youth conference in Malaysia during my internship in 2009. It was very inspiring to meet and work with AIESECers from different countries. Also this conference made me see and experience the international aspect of AIESEC as the “world’s largest student-run organization”. This year I also went to another international conference in Korea and experienced the same thing all over again!

So you might ask, how can I attend these conferences? Read on to find out!

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AIESEC SFU and UBC Working Together

Local Committee Presidents from SFU, UBC and UVIC

Local Committee Presidents from SFU, UBC and UVIC

The rivalry between SFU and UBC has become a custom for many business students but AIESEC puts aside these differences for their annual AlumNight event. Every year, AIESEC SFU and UBC take turns hosting the event while combing their resources.

AlumNight is an important event for AIESEC because it helps us expand and build our AIESEC Alumni relationships. Our Alumni are our central source for business advice, event speakers and support. This event gives us the chance to recognize Alumni members with outstanding contributions to the AIESEC community, as well as give updates on the Local Committees (LC) of SFU, UBC, Kwantlen and UVIC. It’s a great chance for members of the different LCs to meet and mingle while getting inspired from AIESEC Alumni stories. Individually, the LCs would not be ableto host such a successful AlumNight because AIESEC Alumni are a limited resource.

This year, UBC hosted AlumNight but I had the opportunity to be on the Organizing Committee (OC) as the Vice-President of Communications. I’m proud to announce that our OC was all female, with three UBC students and two from SFU. With an inside perspective, I thought I’d share my insight on hosting a joint event with our student club counter-part at UBC.

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Get Involved! Stay Connected!

Are you unsure about your future and your career path? Don’t Worry! Most of us are at the stage where we are still deciding which directions we would like to head towards in our career life. We are still students and we still have time!

What’s next?

This does not mean that we should procrastinate and hope that our dream job will occur in front of your eyes. This means that it is time to get out there and explore different opportunities that lies ahead of you. Since we are students, we still have time to figure out what we want to do in our lives and what we truly enjoy doing. Therefore, students can start getting involved with school clubs or volunteering off-campus to figure out what they enjoy doing. Students should take initiatives by stepping outside the box and allowing themselves to explore and experience different opportunities. As a senior student at SFU, I believe that getting involved with school clubs is extremely beneficial as it has allow myself to figure out my interest. By volunteering and staying involved with school clubs I have . .

  1. Gained experience and skills in various fields including: leadership, time management, team work, relationship building, and the list goes on….
  2. Made good relations with new friends, faculty members and staff around the SFU community
  3. Enhanced my resume
  4. Figured out my interest and strengths
  5. Each student club,organization, or union allows students to elaborate their skills and find their interest. Within a student club, it is compiled of students that are all learning, enjoying, growing, and sharing ideas together! Don’t be afraid! Get involved and stay connected now!  AIESEC SFU is a great way to start!

I’m sure everyone has different experiences with school clubs, what is your experience?

 

Imagine each one of us as a dot and when we connect all the dots together, we create a perfect picture!
Source: http://www.kidsrcrafty.com/images/the_cl5.gif

Increase your Klout Influence on Twitter

Recently, I’ve gotten really interested in learning more about Twitter and Klout. I signed up for Twitter a long time ago before I had any interest in actually using it. I only signed up because I wanted to make sure no one took my username! But once I heard about Klout, which is a score out of 100 that measures your overall online influence, I immediately looked myself up. I had 2/100. It was such an unfortunate score that it motivated me to start taking Twitter more seriously.

Klout uses over 35 variables on Facebook and Twitter in order to determine your influence which is measured with True Reach, Amplification Probability, and Network Score.

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